Bonjour! Je préparais ma salle de classe ce matin et je voulais vite partager un jeu très simple que j'aime jouer avec mes élèves pendant le mois de septembre. Le jeu s'appelle « Pomme, pomme, petite et ronde! » et c'est parfait pour certains moments de transition (par exemple, lorsque les élèves rangent pour venir au tapis - il y en a qui sont toujours plus rapides que d'autres!). Le poème et les cartes se trouvent dans ma boutique Teachers Pay Teachers . À part cela, il vous faut simplement un « arbre » ! J'utilise souvent un « pocket chart » et nos imaginations, parce que c'est facile à mettre et à enlever les pommes lorsqu'on veut recommencer le jeu. Mais, vous pouvez dessiner un arbre sur du papier en grand format (comme dans l'image), en fabriquer et plastifier, utiliser du ruban, du Velcro, etc. C'est à vous de décider! Dans ma salle de classe, nous chantons une chanson pour ranger et venir au tapis. Je fais presque tout mon enseig...
Grab your coffee - this is a long one! :) Clip charts - yay or nay? Ask your teacher friends what they think about behaviour clip charts, and you will probably hear a LOT of differing opinions! Many teachers have used them successfully (and not so successfully) in the past, but it seems that there is a new movement among teachers to "ditch the clip charts" and use other classroom management techniques, for a variety of reasons. Today, I am going to share my thoughts on clip charts, and whether or not I think they can be an effective, positive way to promote positive behaviour in the classroom. A quick Pinterest search for Clip Charts  shows that there are MANY different kinds of clip charts being used in classrooms, with various colours, statements, and themes. Here are a *few* examples of what kinds are out there, taken from a screen grab on my Mac : Basically, a clip chart consists of rainbow-coloured cards organized in a specific order, as determined by ...
Today I am going to share with you the secret to how I keep all of my student data organized. Now, it should be noted that by nature, I am not the most organized person! I am definitely a Type B teacher, and use sticky notes instead of detailed lesson plans, change my ideas on the fly, and sometimes have a hard time keeping my desk tidy. However, I do really want to become a more organized person, so each year I try to focus on something new to work on in that regard. Also, I know that there are certain things that are non-negotiable and must stay organized (like student data), and I do all right at those! In the past, I have used hanging folders to organize my student data. Each student would have a folder with a duo tang inside with their standard evaluations (letters, sight words, numbers, print concepts, etc.) and I would also stuff in other rubrics or evaluations as they were completed throughout the year. Then at parent teacher or during team meetings, I could just grab...