This post contains affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases you make via links on this site, at no additional cost to you. Confession time:  My guided reading lessons used to be a HOT MESS. I knew how to use literacy centres to give the rest of my students meaningful time to independently practice the skills that I had previously taught. I had grouped my students more or less based on what they needed to learn. And I had a nice little table to bring them all to. A nice little table where we would all sit together and they would stare at me expectantly, waiting for me to teach them to read. "Umm, what?!"  thought first-year-teacher-Andrea. "How the heck do you teach someone to read??" Honestly, I never really learned that in university. And my practicums were all with students who already knew how to read  (grades two, three, and four) .  I had no idea how to  start  teaching som...
This post contains affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases you make via links on this site, at no additional cost to you. I have always had a word wall in my classroom, ever since my very first year of teaching. That first year, my word wall was a tiny, dusty mess of too many words stuck up with thumbtacks, squeezed into not enough space on a bulletin board high up in the back corner of my room. Guess how often it was used? Yup - NEVER! Can you relate? I quickly realized that it wasn't worth the upkeep. What's the point of adding new words to a place my students would forget was even there? My students couldn't see the words, they couldn't reach the words, they couldn't use the words... I'm not even convinced they actually knew the words were even  there . Well, I am a problem solver, and I realized after that first year that my word wall situation was a problem I had to solve....
Bonjour! As I am sure you've noticed  (if you teach math en français) , math is a special kind of challenge in the second language classroom. In order for students to learn and understand the concepts that you are teaching, they need to have enough of a grasp of the language to know what you are talking about. Adding lots of visuals while you are teaching helps, of course, but it isn't always enough. It can be exhausting for our students to understand even basic instructions in their second language, leaving little energy left over to solve the actual problem you are asking, or follow the directions to a hands-on activity. Students might also feel too overwhelmed or intimidated to participate actively in their second language, and/or to ask questions when something is unclear. For these reasons, I think that it is really important to start focusing on math vocabulary and "math talk" en français, right from maternelle. Even if  la communication orale  isn...