If you're a teacher, I am CERTAIN what I'm about to say is something you already know from first-hand experience, but teachers don't receive a lot of (any?) money to help outfit their classroom . I had to start my teaching career with recycled alphabet posters - none of which matched! My students were probably so confused because in one area of the classroom, D was for dragon , in another, D was for dauphin , and for their writing folder linking charts, D was for dinosaure ! But I didn't have much choice - I didn't have the money to buy three copies of everything, or the time to make three versions of the same alphabet myself. I've gotten a bit smarter and a bit more resourceful over the years, so today I want to share a little tip for you that has worked really well for me and my students. We need to create/purchase sooo many resources for our classrooms, so today I will share a way to "double dip" and re-purpose any digital posters that you...
Fun fact: prior to last year, I always taught math whole-group. I knew small group math would be valuable, but I didn't have the TIME to sit down and figure it out, and my students were still getting great results with how I was teaching math whole-group. (I do a workshop model, with hands-on practice with a partner every single day, so my students were still getting lots of great math experiences.) Buuuuut, as you may or may not know, I missed half of last year because I was out on maternity leave. I came back to work in January, and I felt so behind in math! My students still hadn't even mastered numbers 1-5, and not only had I not taught any content yet, but it often takes me a few weeks to get the workshop model off the ground. I knew I wouldn't have enough time to make sure every student was meeting every outcome in the few months I had left. With whole-group math, it can be hard to see who isn't grasping each concept until it's time for evaluatio...
This is my seventh year teaching maternelle, and it STILL blows my mind I get to help teach children to read. I remember my very first year teaching, when I had my first ever guided reading group sitting across from me at the table.  I had absolutely NO IDEA what to do with them!!! I had three pairs of eyes staring expectantly at me and no idea how to even START to teach them how to read the words on the pages of their new level one books.  You need to know so many things to be able to read... what do you teach first?   How can you make your students feel successful from the very first lesson? I think other grades have an advantage when it comes to teaching reading (aside from the fact that their students' brains are older and more ready haha) - their students have all already been taught at least *something*, and have a jumping off point. But what do you do when your students are starting from nothing??  How do you get guided reading off the groun...
We all know teachers are busy. And I mean, BUSY. I thought I was busy before, and then I had a baby, and all I can say is WOW. You teachers out there with more than one child and no stay at home parent, you ladies & gents are the real heroes of the world.  2018 was a whole new experience for me. I went back to work when Leah was 5 months old, and her dad stayed home with her (thank you Canada for amazing maternity/parental leaves!) .  Even with Ben at home, life got CRAZY and I had to get really good at prioritizing and really bad at procrastinating.  (I have always been a procrastination queen, so it was a hard habit to unlearn 😉) As a family, we have our feet under us a lot more solidly now and are once again finding time to do the things we enjoy. For me, that means going to the beach, playing hockey, and stalking teacher blogs! In case your 2018 was as insane as mine, I decided to compile a little list for you of my top 5 blog posts you...