Rhyming is fun, and knowing how to rhyme is very important for anyone wanting to learn to read. Last week, I shared with you how much little Andrea loved to rhyme, and how crazy she drove her parents with The Name Song (along with begging for 100 bedtime stories per night, most of which rhymed) . (If you missed it, you can read more about that HERE .) I also explain how (according to a quick Google search - I did not personally do any research/check the validity/sources of this statement) , fewer and fewer kids are starting school adept at rhyming, likely because fewer and fewer parents are teaching their children nursery rhymes and reading them lots of rhyme-y bedtime stories. This is a problem for us maternelle teachers! There is a correlation between rhyming mastery and reading readiness, so if we want our students to learn to read (and read well), we have got to make sure that they have rhyming down pat. And, if they aren't learning nursery rhymes at home with their...
When I was a little girl, I went through lots of weird phases. I don't remember learning to rhyme per say, but I DO remember being obsessed with "The Name Song". I think it was from a TV show, or possibly sung by Sharon, Lois, & Bram, but either way, it went like this: Andrea, Andrea Bo-Bandrea Banana Fana Fo-Fandrea Me Mi Mo Mandrea Andrea! (Substitute any name of your choosing for Andrea, and rhyme accordingly). I remember singing it over and over and over in the car, putting in everyone's name that I could think of. I'm sure my parents LOVED it 😉 I don't know if that song was how I first learned to rhyme, or if it just provided me with (ample) practice, but my love of rhyming continued throughout my childhood. One of my few memories from elementary school is actually writing a poem of which my second-grade teacher was so proud, she had the principal read it over the PA system. (Pretty sure it wasn't that great - I remember the ...
Teachers are busy. We are busy inside of school, and outside of school. During the school day, we are teaching lessons, wiping noses, tying shoes (jk, I don't tie shoes haha) , tracking down lunches, writing notes in agendas, mediating conflicts, and loving our students as if they are our own. After school (and often before school) , we are planning, prepping, answering emails, attending meetings, and you know, trying to live our lives. We have lots to teach! In maternelle especially, we have so many things to teach that don't even necessarily fall under curriculum... but we know that our students won't be really ready for learning until these things are addressed. Sometimes, we spend all of September and October just helping our students learn how to follow a routine and open their lunch containers... and then, suddenly it's Christmas and we feel like we haven't taught anything at all. At this time, if you're anything like me, you might start to f...